Audio Clip

Listen to the audio

Author, Niels Boon, talks about winning the Longuet-Higgins Young Author's Prize.

Author eprints - share your article for free Ukraine Briefing - free access How to get published video - watch now 30% book discount

You are in: Home > Copyright > Copyright assignment and your rights

Copyright assignment and your rights

Image: Copyright and author rights

1. Introduction

For over two hundred years, Taylor & Francis has achieved global, timely dissemination of new and innovative peer-reviewed research knowledge through article publication in our journals.


We work to assure the integrity of the scholarly record and to protect copyright and associated author rights.

Taylor & Francis, and the scholarly and professional associations with whom we are partners, are committed to the stewardship of the scholarly record, and to managing your intellectual property rights (IPR) as these are associated with your article. Your articles may be the primary written report of the results of a scientific research project, supported by funding from Government or commercial sources. This research may be conducted by you alone; or by a research group within a single institution; or via collaboration between research groups internationally. Your research, in its written article form, has been submitted for consideration to a Taylor & Francis journal, and has been subject to rigorous peer review, and authorial revision. Your article in its accepted form will now be published in its final, definitive, and citable form, for the first time, as the Version of Scholarly Record by Taylor & Francis, or by Taylor & Francis on behalf of a scholarly or professional association.

In addition to facilitating peer review, we add value to your accepted manuscript and create the Version of Scholarly Record by editing the manuscript to a style consistent with community and journal conventions, converting it to a suitable digital form, incorporating digital reference links and metadata tags for feeds to abstracting and indexing services, registering the digital object identifier (DOI), and monitoring electronic usage and citation.


2. Our commitment to you

We agree:

2.1. to defend your article against plagiarism and copyright infringement, and to that end, to take all reasonable steps to act against unauthorized replication of your article in part or in whole;

2.2. to receive and to administer permissions and deal with licensing issues relating to your article;

2.3. to maintain the integrity of your article as the Version of Scholarly Record, “the sworn statement of science”, a definitive, citable, permanent, and secure record of an article, accessible in perpetuity;

2.4. to ensure that the published version of your article carries an appropriate level of metadata tagging to facilitate discovery and logging by search engines;

2.5. to ensure the safe archiving of your article and as required to ensure that a copy is deposited in any national archive deriving from the Legal Deposit Libraries Act 2003;

2.6. to advise you on how to cite your article in both print and online formats;

2.7. to enable you to share your article with colleagues via our eprint service;

2.8. to deposit your article on your behalf into any repository with which we have an agreement, for example, PubMed or the World Bank.


3. Copyright

We recommend that authors assign copyright in journal articles to Taylor & Francis or the journal proprietor (such as a learned society on whose behalf we publish). Our belief is that the assignment of copyright in an article by the author to us or to the proprietor of a journal on whose behalf we publish remains the best course of action for proprietor and author alike, as assignment allows Taylor & Francis, without ambiguity, to assure the integrity of the Version of Scholarly Record, founded on rigorous and independent peer review. Moreover, given a journal is a single copyright entity composed of multiple contributions, assignment allows us to properly manage both an author’s and proprietor’s intellectual property rights (IPR) associated with the article, and to act on an author’s and proprietor’s behalf when resolving allegations of plagiarism, abuse of moral rights, or infringements of copyright. Assignment also eliminates confusion over copyright in multiple-author articles, and facilitates our ability to negotiate subsidiary licenses with and administer permissions and reuse requests from third parties. Most importantly, we believe assignment enhances the reputation and prestige of the journal, its proprietor, its editors and editorial board, its peer review processes, and the added value we bring. You will be sent the assignment automatically, via our Central Article Tracking System (CATS), in the form of your Author Publishing Agreement.

For the avoidance of doubt, any patent rights, trademark rights, or rights to any process, product, or procedure described in an article are not assigned or licensed by you to us by virtue of the Author Publishing Agreement.

3.1 Moral rights

Similarly, you expressly reserve and assert your right to be identified as the Author of the Article, such right arising under section 77 of the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, and all your other moral rights arising under the Act and, so far as is legally possible, any broadly equivalent rights you may have in any territory of the world.

3.2 Retained rights

In assigning Taylor & Francis or the journal proprietor copyright, or granting an exclusive license to publish, you retain:

  • the right to share on a non-commercial basis with colleagues in print or digital format your "Author's Original Manuscript" (i.e., the unpublished version of the article created by you prior to peer review; formerly a "preprint");
  • the right to post your Author Accepted Manuscript (AAM) on your departmental or personal website at any point after publication of your article. You must insert a link from your posted Author Accepted Manuscript to the published article on the publisher site with the following text:

    "This is an Author’s Accepted Manuscript of an article published in [JOURNAL TITLE] [date of publication], available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/[Article DOI]."

    You may not post the final version of the article as published by us (the Version of Record) to any site, unless it has been published as open access on our website.

    Embargoes apply (see below for applicable embargo periods) if you are posting the AAM to an institutional or subject repository.

  • the right to retain on a non-commercial basis your Author's Original Manuscript version of the article as specified above following publication in the journal with the acknowledgment below:

    "This is an Author's Original Manuscript of an article whose final and definitive form, the Version of Record, has been published in the [JOURNAL TITLE] [date of publication] [copyright Taylor & Francis], available online at: http://www.tandfonline.com/[Article DOI]."

  • the right to post on a non-commercial basis your "Author's Accepted Manuscript" (i.e., your manuscript in the form accepted for publication, revised after peer review; formerly a "postprint"),  as a digital file on your own website for personal or professional use, or on your institution's network or intranet or website, or in a subject repository that does not offer content for commercial sale or for any systematic external distribution by a third party, provided that you do not use the PDF version of the article prepared by us and that you include any amendments or deletions or warnings relating to the article issued or published by us; in compliance with the embargo periods detailed below; and only with this acknowledgement:

    "This is an Author's Accepted Manuscript of an article published in [include the complete citation information for the final version of the article as published in the [JOURNAL TITLE] [date of publication] [copyright Taylor & Francis], available online at: http://www.tandfonline.com/[Article DOI]."

    As noted above, as part of our Author Services program, Taylor & Francis will deposit the Author’s Accepted Manuscript in any designated institutional repository with which Taylor & Francis has a Deposit Agreement, including PubMedCentral (PMC).

    Taylor & Francis mandates public access to the final version of your manuscript twelve (12) months after the publication of the Version of Scholarly Record in science, engineering, behavioral science, and medicine; and eighteen (18) months after first publication for arts, social science, and humanities journals, in digital or print form.

  • the right to share with colleagues on a non-commercial basis copies of an article in its published form as supplied by Taylor & Francis as a digital eprint or printed reprint;


  • the right to make printed copies of all or part of an article on a non-commercial basis for use by you for lecture or classroom purposes provided that such copies are not offered for sale or distributed in any systematic way, and provided that acknowledgment to prior publication in the journal is made explicit;


  • the right to facilitate the distribution of the article on a non-commercial basis if the article has been produced within the scope of your employment, so that your employer may use all or part of the article internally within the institution or company provided that acknowledgment to prior publication in the journal is made explicit;


  • the right to include an article in a thesis or dissertation that is not to be published commercially, provided that acknowledgment to prior publication in the journal is made explicit;


  • the right to present an article at a meeting or conference and to distribute printed copies of the article to the delegates attending the meeting provided that this is not for commercial purposes and provided that acknowledgment to prior publication in the journal is made explicit;


  • the right to use the article in its published form in whole or in part without revision or modification in personal compilations [in print or digital form] or other publications of your own articles, provided that acknowledgment to prior publication in the journal is made explicit;


  • the right to expand an article into book-length form for publication provided that acknowledgment to prior publication in the journal is made explicit.

If you wish to use your article in a way which is not covered by the above license, please contact the Taylor & Francis Permissions Team:
permissionrequest@tandf.co.uk

Such uses might include the reuse of your article for commercial gain by a third party.

3.3 Green open access

You may post your Author Accepted Manuscript (AAM) on your departmental or personal website at any point after publication of your article. You must insert a link from your posted Author Accepted Manuscript to the published article on the publisher site with the following text:

"This is an Author’s Accepted Manuscript of an article published in [JOURNAL TITLE] [date of publication], available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/ [Article DOI]."

You may not post the final version of the article as published by us (the Version of Record) to any site, unless it has been published as open access on our website.

Embargoes apply (see PDF | Excel for applicable embargo periods) if you are posting the AAM to an institutional or subject repository.

3.4 Retrospective coverage

We are happy to extend all these provisions to the many thousands of authors who have signed copyright assignments and licenses to publish in the past with Taylor & Francis or one of its constituent imprints, without the need to seek amendment to the previous agreements.


Back to top

4. Copyright transfer FAQs

Image: Copyright transfer FAQs

CHECKLIST


Completing the Publishing Agreement

I have not published my Article previously.
I have not submitted my Article to another journal, and I confirm that it is not under consideration by any other journal.
I intend to publish the Article exclusively with Taylor & Francis.
I am only claiming Crown Copyright if I or one of my co-Authors is a Minister or civil servant.
I am only claiming U.S. Government non-Copyrightable Status if I or one of my co-Authors is an officer or employee of the Federal Government of the United States of America.
If I or one of my colleagues is a National Institutes of Health (NIH) employee, I have attached an NIH Addendum instead of signing the Publishing Agreement.
If I or one of my colleagues is a contractor of the U.S. Government (including NIH contractors), I have included my contract number and understand that I am still required to complete the form in full.
I understand that if I am working in a university as a researcher/lecturer but am grant funded and am submitting this work as part of my normal research, my work does not qualify as a "work for hire".
I have acknowledged any/all third party funders, giving full names and grant numbers.
I have not used an electronic signature.
I understand that I must return the completed and signed original of this form via post.
If I have multiple papers, I have filled in each form for the paper with the tracking ID in the watermark in the top left. I have not reused a copy of the same form for multiple papers.

My understanding

My work is original.
I have secured all the necessary permissions for use of third party material.
I have not included any statement that could be considered: abusive, defamatory, libelous, obscene, fraudulent, to infringe the rights of others, or to be in any other way unlawful or in violation of applicable laws.
I have obtained consent for inclusion of material related to patients, clients or participants in any research or clinical experiment or study. Furthermore I confirm that no such individual can be identified by the article, nor will I identify them in any way.
I have included any relevant safety points and procedures in the Article.
I have reviewed the Taylor & Francis Publishing Ethics and Disclosure of Conflicts of Interest policies.
I have acknowledged in the text of the Article any financial interest I have or benefit arising from the direct applications of my research.
I have consulted any co-authors and guarantee that I have been authorized by all co-authors to sign on their behalf, if applicable.
If the warranties outlined above are breached I understand that I will keep Taylor & Francis and their affiliates indemnified in full against all loss, damages, injury, costs and expenses (including legal and other professional fees and expenses) incurred or paid by Taylor & Francis as a result.

FAQ


5. Why am I being asked to assign copyright?

We recommend that authors assign copyright in journal articles to Taylor & Francis or the journal proprietor (such as a learned society on whose behalf we publish). Our belief is that the assignment of copyright in an article by the author to us or to the proprietor of a journal on whose behalf we publish remains the best course of action for proprietor and author alike, as assignment allows Taylor & Francis, without ambiguity, to assure the integrity of the Version of Scholarly Record, founded on rigorous and independent peer review. Moreover, given a journal is a single copyright entity composed of multiple contributions, assignment allows us to properly manage both an author’s and proprietor’s intellectual property rights (IPR) associated with the article, and to act on an author’s and proprietor’s behalf when resolving allegations of plagiarism, abuse of moral rights, or infringements of copyright. Assignment also eliminates confusion over copyright in multiple-author articles, and facilitates our ability to negotiate subsidiary licenses with and administer permissions and reuse requests from third parties. Most importantly, we believe assignment enhances the reputation and prestige of the journal, its proprietor, its editors and editorial board, its peer review processes, and the added value we bring. You will be sent the assignment automatically, via our Central Article Tracking System (CATS), in the form of your Author Publishing Agreement.

For the avoidance of doubt, any patent rights, trademark rights, or rights to any process, product, or procedure described in an article are not assigned or licensed by you to us by virtue of the Author Publishing Agreement.

You will note your published article has been assigned a digital object identifier (DOI) to assure digital copyright protection - see www.doi.org


6. What if I want to retain copyright in my own name?

Whilst Taylor & Francis strongly advise authors to assign copyright, it may not necessarily be a condition of publication. In some circumstances, we permit an author to retain copyright of his or her paper, but we must receive an original formal signed statement licensing us to publish the work exclusively, worldwide, and in all forms, in the journal.


7. What if I do not own copyright of the article I have written?

We seek to accommodate authors who are employees of governments, international organizations, or commercial corporations. Such entities will retain and assert copyright in works done as part of a person’s employment. Such entities will normally issue and grant Taylor & Francis a “non-exclusive” license to publish. In such situations, the Author Publishing Agreement now stipulates that in so doing, such entities recognize Taylor & Francis as the sole licensee for the publication of the final, definitive, and citable Version of Scholarly Record.

The copyright in the article will therefore appear in the name of the employing entity.

Where such articles are multiple-author works, and not all co-authors are employees of governments, international organizations, or commercial corporations, then the Publishing Agreement requires the corresponding author to confirm that these co-authors waive their right to appear in any copyright notice appearing in the article, but not their right to be named as co-authors on the article.

If you are a U.K., Canadian, Australian, or Commonwealth Realm Government employee, and you wrote your article in that capacity, you must submit your article for clearance by the Permanent Head of the Department concerned. The Crown will retain and assert copyright.

If your work was authored as part of your official duties as an employee of the United States Government and is therefore a work of the United States Government, in accordance with 17 U.S.C. 105, no copyright protection is available for such works under U.S. Law.

In either case it is the responsibility of an author to make the necessary enquiries and arrangements.

In either case, the governments will grant Taylor & Francis a non-exclusive license to publish the article and recognize us as the sole licensee for the publication of the final, definitive, and citable Version of Scholarly Record.

If you are an employee of the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development/The World Bank, your work is governed by the "Publication Framework Agreement (PFA)" which the World Bank and Taylor & Francis has agreed. The PFA allows World Bank employees who are journal article authors to comply with the World Bank’s Open Access policy. This allows for the posting of an Author’s Original Manuscript (the version submitted for peer review) in the Bank’s repository for public access at any time, and the posting of the Author’s Accepted Manuscript (the version revised after peer review, but prior to Taylor & Francis’s copy-editing, etc.) in the Bank’s repository after an embargo of 18 months, with a link to the Taylor & Francis Version of Scholarly Record. The World Bank asserts and retains copyright in each article.

You will need to complete, sign, and attach the Individual Journal Article Publishing Agreement to your manuscript submission.


8. Will assigning copyright prevent me from exploiting my own work?

No. Certain "moral rights" were conferred on authors by the U.K. Copyright Designs and Patents Act in 1988. In the U.K. an author's "right of paternity", the right to be credited whenever the work is published (or performed or broadcast), requires that this right be asserted in writing. In assigning copyright an author is not forfeiting his or her other proprietary rights.

Nothing in the Author Publishing Agreement is intended to restrict an author's rights as the author, or in the case of work written by an author during the course of his or her employment, an author's employer's rights, to revise, adapt, prepare derivative works, present orally, or otherwise make use of the contents of the article.

For example, authors themselves retain the right to reproduce their own paper in any volume of which the author acts as editor or author, subject to acknowledgment and citation.

The sole condition is that authors advise us of such reproduction, and acknowledge and cite the journal as the original source of publication.


9. If I have used any previously published material do I need to acknowledge this?

Yes. We require that you obtain the necessary written permission in advance from any third-party owners of copyright for the use in print and electronic formats of any of their text, illustrations, graphics, or other material, in your article and in our journal. The same applies to any other necessary consent. Taylor & Francis is a signatory of and respects the spirit of the STM Agreement regarding the free sharing and dissemination of scholarly information. As such we partake in the reciprocal free exchange of material. Suggested wording for the request for permission is given here.

It is also important to ensure you acknowledge the source in your figure captions, and cite the source in your References section.


10. What happens if Taylor & Francis does not publish the article?

If the paper is not published in the journal, the rights revert to the author as original copyright holder.


11. What do these statements mean?

I am a U.K., Canadian or Australian Government employee and claim Crown Copyright

Crown Copyright applies to material which is produced by employees of the Crown in the course of their duties. Therefore, most material originated by Ministers and civil servants is protected by Crown Copyright. Tick this option if you are a Government employee and your nationality is one of any of the 16 countries listed below that fall within the Commonwealth Realm. By ticking this option you are requested to provide a copyright statement.

  • Antigua and Barbuda
  • Australia
  • The Bahamas
  • Barbados
  • Belize
  • Canada
  • Grenada
  • Jamaica
  • New Zealand
  • Papua New Guinea
  • Saint Kitts and Nevis
  • Saint Lucia
  • Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
  • Solomon Islands
  • Tuvalu
  • United Kingdom

For further information, please see the Office of Public Sector Information guidelines here: www.opsi.gov.uk/advice/crown-copyright/index.


12. I am a civil servant/public sector employee and I have been advised to issue Taylor & Francis an "Open Government Licence"

The "Open Government Licence” (OGL) covers the publication and dissemination of public sector-authored information, data, and content. The OGL does not replace Crown Copyright, but rather is a way for researchers who work in the U.K. public sector to license content (as well as databases and source codes developed as part of their public-sector duties) that is subject to Crown Copyright. The OGL allows Taylor & Francis to be the sole licensee for the publication of the final and definitive Version of Record. An article covered by an OGL should include an attribution statement and a link to the OGL as a footnote on the title page of the journal article, e.g.: Crown Copyright © 2011 This article is published under an Open Government Licence www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/doc/open-government-licence/


13. I am a U.S. Government employee and there is no copyright to transfer

A work of the United States Federal Government, as defined by United States copyright law, is "a work prepared by an officer or employee of the U.S. Government as part of that person's official duties". The term only applies to the work of the Federal Government, not state or local governments. In general, under section 105 of the Copyright Act, such works are not entitled to domestic copyright protection under U.S. Law, sometimes referred to as "non-copyright". Tick this option if you are an employee of the U.S. Government.

Unless you supply us with a specific form of wording we will use the following:

"This work was authored as part of the Contributor's official duties as an Employee of the United States Government and is therefore a work of the United States Government. In accordance with 17 U.S.C. 105, no copyright protection is available for such works under U.S. Law."

If you are a contractor of the U.S. Government, please see §16 below.


14. I am a National Institutes of Health (NIH) employee and there is no copyright to transfer. I am not required to sign this form and instead attach the NIH addendum

Tick this option if the NIH Public Access Policy applies to your manuscript, which arises from:

  • any direct funding from an NIH grant or co-operative agreement active in fiscal year 2008 or beyond, where "directly funded" refers to costs that can be specifically identified with a particular project or activity;
  • any direct funding from an NIH contract signed on or after April 7, 2008;
  • any direct funding from the NIH Intramural Program.

You must attach the NIH addendum; see the NIH FAQ page http://publicaccess.nih.gov/FAQ.htm


15. Do I need to deposit my article into PubMedCentral (PMC)?

No. Through Taylor & Francis' direct manuscript feed it will not be necessary for you to deposit a manuscript yourself. As part of our Author Services program, with respect to National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded research, we will deposit into PubMedCentral (PMC) manuscripts on behalf of Taylor & Francis, Routledge, and Psychology Press authors reporting NIH-funded research.

This service is offered as part of Taylor & Francis' 2008 deposit agreement with the NIH and allows authors to comply with the NIH’s revised "Public Access Policy" which mandates NIH-funded authors to submit to PubMed Central (PMC), or have submitted on their behalf, at the point of acceptance, their peer-reviewed Author’s Accepted Manuscript, to appear on PMC no later than 12 months after final publication. Taylor & Francis will deliver to PMC the final peer-reviewed the Author’s Accepted Manuscript, that is, the version of the article which was accepted for publication and that reflects any author-agreed changes made in response to the peer review.

Taylor & Francis will also authorize the Author’s Accepted Manuscript's public access posting 12 months after final publication in print or electronic form (whichever is the sooner). Following the deposit by Taylor & Francis, authors will receive further communications from the NIH with respect to the submission.

Taylor & Francis will deposit all open-access articles published in Taylor & Francis Open and Open Select journals immediately in .pdf and .xml formats; no embargo is applied.


16. I am a contractor of the U.S. Government (includes NIH contractors)

Unlike works of the U.S. Government, works produced by contractors under government contracts (or submitted in anticipation of such contracts) are protected and restricted under U.S. copyright law. Contract terms and conditions vary between agencies and depend on the terms of the contract and the type of work undertaken; we advise you to consult your counsel if you are in any doubt as to whether this statement applies to you. You are required to supply a copyright statement to be used, for example:
"This material is published by permission of the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, operated by Stanford University for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. [contract number]. The U.S. Government retains for itself, and others acting on its behalf, a paid-up, non-exclusive, and irrevocable worldwide license in said article to reproduce, prepare derivative works, distribute copies to the public, and perform publicly and display publicly, by or on behalf of the Government."

For further information, please visit the United States Copyright Office website:
http://www.copyright.gov/.


17. What if I am not sole author?

A “sole author” is defined as: an author from whom a manuscript originates, when only one author has contributed.

A “co-author” is defined as: an author from whom a manuscript originates, when more than one author has contributed.

You must specify the number of authors and, if at all practical, all co-authors should sign this Agreement. If not, we require you to secure the permission of your co-authors to act on their behalf, and sign the Agreement. If you are one among a number of authors and one or more of the statements under section 7. above applies to any author, please consult your counsel. In the case of collaboration between a U.S. Government employee and a non-Government author we suggest you refer to www.cendi.gov/publications/04-8copyright.html#327 and if in any doubt seek the advice of your counsel.


18. What is a "work made for hire"? Would my university class as an "employer" in this case?

No. A university is not considered to be an employer if you are grant-funded but merely working within the institution.

“Work made for hire” is sometimes referred to as “corporate authorship” and is when the employer – not the employee – is considered the legal author. The incorporated entity serving as an employer may be a corporation or other legal entity, an organization, or an individual. Please consult your employer to obtain a copyright statement to be used.


19. My institution has asked me to submit an addendum to the agreement. Is this acceptable?

No. An addendum to the Author Publishing Agreement is unacceptable and, in fact, unnecessary. An addendum may constitute an attempt to introduce an unsigned document which claims priority over a Publishing Agreement. Such a document is invalid and inequitable in any system of law. Taylor & Francis' liberal Author Rights policy has been designed to meet authors' interests and needs. Taylor & Francis supports the widest possible access to the scientific, scholarly, and medical literature through innovative and creative publishing policy and practice, founded on the highest standards of peer review, and on our stewardship of the scholarly record.


20. Do I need to declare any funding?

Yes. The name of any/all third-party funders must be given in full. In addition, the full names and numbers of all grants must be given in the acknowledgments section of your article.

For further information, please see our Disclosure of Conflicts of Interest section.


21. What exactly is meant by “assignment of publishing rights”?

When “assigning publishing rights”, be it an assignment of copyright or a grant of an exclusive license to publish, you retain your Author Rights.

In order for Taylor & Francis to publish and establish your article as the Version of Record, you need to grant us an exclusive license to:

  • publish, reproduce, distribute, display, and store your article, worldwide, in all forms;1

  • translate your article into other languages, and create adaptations, summaries, extracts, or other derivative works based on the article;
  • sub-license these rights to third-party data aggregators – thus maximizing dissemination.

If of course your article is not accepted for publication, or is withdrawn, then the license is rendered null and void, and all rights revert to you.


22. What are the responsibilities of Taylor & Francis as publisher of my article?

Following rigorous peer review, we shall prepare the final, accepted version of your article for publication in the journal by having it copy-edited for style, fluency, and consistency, and share a proof with you for checking and approval prior to publication.2



23. What rights do I have to post a preprint of my unpublished article?

A “preprint” is now defined as the Author’s Original Manuscript. Always providing that the editorial policy of the journal concerned allows this, you may post your Author’s Original Manuscript (the version of your article created prior to peer review) on your own website, institution’s intranet, or preprint server, for example www.arXiv.org.


24. Do I have to pay to publish my work in an Open Select title?

No, if you don’t pay the article publishing charge (APC) then your work will published behind the subscription paywall. You can still make your work open access by posting your Author Original Manuscript or Author Accepted Manuscript in your institutional or subject repository (green open access). For further information please see our Green open access section.


25. What must I declare as Author under “Author Warranties”?

See: Publishing Ethics.
It is mandatory that you make legally binding guarantees in respect of the originality and provenance of your Article and its component parts. Taylor & Francis Group is a member of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE), and we recommend you read our Guidelines on Ethics. You are required to confirm that you have reviewed Taylor & Francis' Ethics and Conflicts of Interest and Disclosure policies.

It is essential that you obtain formal written permission from copyright owners for the reuse of any third-party copyright material in your article, for example, text, figures, or tables. This is especially important in relation to the reproduction of poetry and lyrics, and photographs of artworks. As noted above (Section 5.), it is important to ensure you acknowledge the source in your figure captions, and cite the source in your References section. We suggest you consult The Design and Artists Copyright Society in relation to the reproduction of artworks.

We urge you to exercise extreme caution with respect to images you may find on the Internet. These have often been posted without the permission of the copyright holder; a reference to a website hosting an image is not commensurate with formal permission.

Apart from the authorized reproduction of appropriate third-party copyright material, you giving us warranties – legally binding guarantees –  that your article is your original work.

In this respect, you guarantee that nothing in the article infringes the legal rights of any other person or entity, and that neither the article nor any part of it could be construed as copying any other person's published work and attempting to pass this off as your own work. You also guarantee that neither the article nor any part of it is abusive, defamatory, libelous, obscene, fraudulent, or in any way infringes the rights of others, or is in any other way unlawful or in violation of applicable laws.

You are guaranteeing that your article has not been published previously, nor is it under consideration by any other journal. If we discover it has been, we reserve the right to retract your article and prohibit you from making new submissions to Taylor & Francis journals.

You are guaranteeing that you have written consent from any patient, client, or participant in any research or clinical experiment or study for the inclusion of material pertaining to them. You are guaranteeing you have anonymized such patients, clients, or participants, and confirmed with them that they are assured they cannot be identified via the article.

You are guaranteeing that you have highlighted all relevant health and safety issues in your article which would have a bearing on the successful outcome of repeating your research. You must include appropriate warnings concerning any particular hazards that may be involved in carrying out experiments or procedures described in your article, but it is assumed that basic good laboratory practice and all mandatory laboratory health and safety procedures have been complied with in the course of conducting any experimental work reported in your article. Basic and mandatory practices need not be repeated in the article text unless they have an influence on the results being reported.

You are guaranteeing that all the co-authors listed have authorized you to act as Corresponding Author, and make warranties on their behalf.


26. As an author, can I use screenshots or grabs of film or video in my article or take such images from the Internet?

Only with the permission of the copyright owner. You should always obtain written permission from the appropriate rightsholder for the reproduction of any proprietary audio, video, film stills, and screenshots. This includes those that can be taken from the nternet, e.g., from Wikipedia, Google, or FaceBook. We urge caution when sourcing images from the Internet, as these may have been posted without the permission of the rightsholder. You should be advised that many rightsholders (e.g., film and television companies) will charge fees and in certain cases there may also be additional fees payable to the actors featured in the images. In the same way as for stills, film clips and extracts of video should be used specifically within the context of the article for criticism or review. Each clip should be no longer than is necessary to illustrate the point made in the text. You should always provide full credits for the source of every image or clip.


27. Do I need permission to reproduce the cover image of a book as part of a book review?

Yes. If you choose to include the cover image then permission from the book publisher will need to be sought. In addition, we recommend that the image used be of a high quality/resolution and that this image be sought directly from the book publisher when seeking permission to use the cover image. Please be aware that on some occasions the book cover may have additional third-party rights attached for images contained with it and thus the permissions for reuse may be restricted.


28. Is this agreement legally binding?

Yes. This agreement (and any dispute, proceeding, claim or controversy in relation to it) is subject to English Law and the jurisdiction of the Courts of England and Wales. If you are found to be in breach of any of these warranties, you are liable to indemnify Taylor & Francis against all loss, damages, injury, costs and expenses (including legal and other professional fees and expenses) awarded against or incurred or paid by us as a result of a breach.


29. Supplementary material online

Supplementary material online must be pertinent to and support the article to which it relates.

It must be submitted simultaneously with the article.

It should at least be subject to editor oversight.

More extensive supplementary material (analyses rather than data) ideally should be subject to peer review.

When appropriate, it should carry a disclaimer – Taylor & Francis to be consulted.

Any pod- or vodcaster must sign the Taylor & Francis license as requested.

Warranties regarding the originality, validity, and legality of the supplementary material online are covered by the agreed license to publish.


POST-PUBLICATION


30. What do I receive once the article is published?

Author eprints allow you as an author to quickly and easily give anyone free online access to your article. You can do this by sharing a unique eprint link which will give your friends and contacts free access to read and download your published article without them having to register or even sign in.

To share your eprints simply sign in and go to the My authored works area within My Account and copy the eprint link. You can then paste this eprint link into an email, add it to your blog or website, or post it to your social media profiles to begin sharing free access to your article. The eprint is the link that starts with "www.tandfonline.com/eprint/" followed by a string of characters and numbers.

You have 50 eprints to share, which gives up to 50 people the chance to read and download a copy of your article. The link will continue to work after the free access allowance has been used up by directing people to the article's abstract page. As the author, you will of course always have free access to your article via My authored works.


31. What is RightsLinkTM?

RightsLinkTM is a division of the Copyright Clearance Center. RightsLinkTM offers a secure website where authors can purchase reprints of their article. Additionally, many of the articles on Taylor & Francis Online are available for custom reprint orders through RightslinkTM. A link labeled "Order Reprints" appears on the article's title and abstract page.


32. What is Taylor & Francis's position on photocopying?

Our policy on photocopying is that a third party is free to make one copy of an article for the purposes of private study or research without seeking the permission of either Taylor & Francis or the author. Unlicensed multiple copying without permission is illegal.

Taylor & Francis participates in a number of photo- and digital copying licensing schemes which exist in many countries for the purposes of private study or research, as co-ordinated by the International Federation of Reproduction Rights Organizations (IFFRO), for example, the Copyright Licensing Agency (U.K.) and Copyright Clearance Center (U.S.A.), non-profit-making organizations which offer centralized licensing arrangements for photocopying.


AUTHOR PUBLISHING AGREEMENTS

All Author Publishing Agreements are watermarked against their unique CATS identification number. Because these fields are unique and will not change during the production process, these are used to match Author Publishing Agreements against articles. You will be sent a different Author Publishing Agreement for each paper. Completing the same form multiple times for different articles may result in the forms being misfiled. For your reference, the watermarks also include the first few words of the article title. However, please note that if the paper was reviewed through ScholarOne Manuscripts and the article title changed during the review process, this will reference the old article title.

¹ This encompasses all formats and media now known or as developed in the future, including print, electronic, and digital forms.

² Taylor & Francis reserves the right to make such editorial changes as may be necessary to make the article suitable for publication or as we reasonably consider necessary to avoid infringing third-party rights or law. Taylor & Francis also reserves the right not to proceed with publication for whatever reason.


Back to top

Disclosure of conflicts of interest

Image: Disclosure of conflicts of interest

A conflict of interest may occur when an author or an author's employer or sponsor has a financial, commercial, legal, or professional relationship with other organizations or with the people working with them that may exert an influence on that author's research.

A conflict can be actual or potential and as such disclosure in full is required at the point of submission by the author. All manuscript submissions to the Journal must include the disclosure of any and all relationships that could be viewed as presenting a potential conflict of interest. Once disclosed, the Journal Editor may use such information for making editorial decisions and may publish such disclosures if they are held to be important to readers in judging the manuscript. Additionally, a decision may be made by the Journal Editor or peer reviewers not to publish on the basis of any declared conflict.

Personal conflicts of interest

A list of potential conflicts of interest in relation to the submitted manuscript could include:

  • Consultancies
  • Employment
  • Grants
  • Fees & Honoraria
  • Patents
  • Royalties
  • Stock or share ownership

If necessary, please describe any potential conflicts of interest in a covering letter, indicating funding when greater than US$2000.00 per year. All funding sources supporting the work should also be acknowledged.

Institutional conflicts of interest

Are you aware that your employer has any financial interest in or a financial conflict with the subject matter or materials discussed in the manuscript? If 'Yes' then please also provide additional detail in a covering letter.

Disclosure statement

Authors should also include a relevant Disclosure Statement along with the text of their article, in conjunction with any Acknowledgments and Details of Funders.

Related Information

Back to top

Library and Information Science author rights

As of November 1, 2011, Taylor & Francis enacted new author rights policies for our Library and Information Science journals.


Visit the author rights information for Library and Information Science titles

Back to top

Was this page helpful?

this page was helpful this page was not helpful

¹ Revised September 2009